Daylight Savings Has Begun

Pink and white flowers and a pink alarm clock on a wooden planked platform against a blue sky with the words Spring Forward

Do you feel like today is the most Monday-ist of Mondays? I know the feeling. Yea, it's great when we "fall" back and gain an hour of sleep but this whole "spring" ahead things messes with me. If it messes with you too, we are not alone.

 

Research done by Dr. Beth Ann Malow, professor of Neurology and Pediatrics in the Sleep Disorders Division at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, backs this. 

“It’s not one hour twice a year. It’s a misalignment of our biologic clocks for eight months of the year. When we talk about DST and the relationship to light, we are talking about profound impacts on the biological clock, which is a structure rooted in the brain. It impacts brain functions such as energy levels and alertness.”

Over all, Daylight Savings Time:

 

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