How does blood pressure impact your sleep?

Hypertension and OSA

 

There are many comorbid medical conditions associated with unmanaged obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) the most common of which is hypertension. The most recent research indicates that thirty to fifty percent of those who have essential hypertension have OSA. Individuals with drug-resistant hypertension are even more likely (eighty percent) to have OSA.

The pathophysiology of this relationship involves two primary pathways. Simply stated when oxygen levels in the blood drop abnormally due to obstructed breathing there is a decrease in available oxygen to produce nitric oxide in the body. No air breathed in on inspiration means no oxygen. An important function of nitric oxide is vasodilation of the blood vessels. Without sufficient amounts of nitric oxide in the blood the vessels constrict that can result in hypertension. A second pathway to hypertension related to OSA involves the “fight or flight” syndrome or sympathetic activation that occurs with every breathing obstruction during sleep. The sympathetic response in the body to each obstruction is elevation in blood pressure, heart rate and respiration rate. Repetitive collapse of the airway numerous times per hour throughout the night does not allow the blood pressure to reset to the usual level. During sleep blood pressure is known to drop ie “dip” about ten percent of the normal daytime level. Apneics are termed “non-dippers” as their blood pressure is repeatedly elevating and essentially remains at the higher level upon awakening and throughout the day.

 

Prevalence and associated factors of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with resistant hypertension. Am J Hypertens. 2014 Aug;27(8):1069-78. Muxfeldt, Margallo Guimarães,Salles

Association of sleep-disordered breathing, sleep apnea, and hypertension in a large community-based study. Sleep Heart Health Study. JAMA. 2000 Apr 12;283(14):1829-36;Nieto FJ1Young TBLind BKShahar ESamet JMRedline SD'Agostino RBNewman ABLebowitz MDPickering TG.

Author
Michael F. Hnat, DMD, DABDSM Headshot Michael F. Hnat, DMD, DABDSM, DABCDSM Dr. Michael Hnat brings exemplary knowledge and experience in both dental sleep medicine and TMJ-related issues. He is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine and the prestigious mini-residency in Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Disorders from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. He is Clinical Assistant Professor in dental sleep medicine at the West Virginia University School of Dentistry. The focus of his clinical practice is oral appliance therapy for the treatment of sleep-related breathing problems, TMJ disorders, and head and neck muscle pain. Dr. Hnat is credentialed thru the American Board of Dental Sleep Medicine and the American Board of Craniofacial Dental Sleep Medicine.

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